MISHAWAKA PILOTS CLUB

Blue Skies and Tailwinds .....
2016 Mishawaka Pilots Club. All Rights Reserved. The Mishawaka Pilots Club is not responsible for the misuse of any information provided
Spotlight on our Members .......
One of our founding members ...Charles Sisk
Charles Sisk Spring of 1942 Army Flight School
Charles Sisk 1944 US Army Airforce
Charles & Kathleen Sisk with the Governor of Tennessee (Center) in 1995
One of our MPC Members, Keith Vergon giving an airplane ride in his Grumman AA-1 to Amy Freehafer who happens to be 80 years young.
Amy took flying lessons 50 years ago and even soloed, however she postponed getting her pilots license to raise her family. Her husband was one of the MPC founders, and they flew together frequently. Welcome back to the air Amy, and a big Thanks to Keith for making it happen. It's members like Keith that keep the Mishawaka Pilots Club the place to be !
Let's Show Our Pride In Our Current and Former Members
During President Donald Trump's visit to our area, we had the honor of hosting one of his support helicopters
A news story was published in the Texarkana Gazette ....

http://www.texarkanagazette.com/news/story/story/2018/Oct/30/wwii-pilot-reunited-vintage-plane/750042/

Here are a few excerpts from the article ...

Former U.S. Army Air Force Capt. Ralph Miller received a birthday gift about a month early this year.

Miller got the chance Monday to see a warplane he hadn't flown since being stationed in Lake Charles, La. in the spring of 1944 as a bomber pilot with the U.S. Ninth Tactical Air Force in Europe during World War II,

Shortly before 10 a.m. Monday, a World War II vintage Douglas A-26 Invader, built in 1943 and owned by the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) Flight Museum, landed at Texarkana Regional Airport.

"I remember when I first saw one of these and that's when my senior officer asked me if I could fly one of these things and I told him that if the plane flew like a bee, I could," Miller, who will be 99 years old next month, said. "At that point, we took off and flew about 3,00 to 4,000 feet off the ground for a little while—circling around the Lake Charles area."

Although Miller would eventually be deployed to Europe in August 1944 and be assigned to fly a similar warplane to the A-26 called the Martin B-26 Marauder, he never forgot the Invader.

"I've been as high up at 16,000 feet, but normally we usually flew only as high as 12,000 to 13,000 to 14,000 feet while we were on bombing missions in Europe," said Miller, who went on to win 11 Air Medals and the Distinguished Flying Cross during the war. "When those anti-aircraft flak shells exploded around us, you could see the black smoke puff coming out of those orange balls of fire and the hot shell fragments would sound just like gravel being shaken in a tin can when they hit the side of our plane."

"Last month I got the call that they could be here and it's been an amazing day to see them here," Bemenderfer said. "Ever since I heard Ralph's stories when I was a kid, I've wanted to fly. My uncle is the reason I became a pilot."
Our Member, Todd Bemenderfer was able to provide his 98 year old Uncle Ralph Miller a very unique Birthday Gift (Ralph will be 99 in late 2018). His Uncle flew multiple aircraft during WW II but loved his Douglas A-26 Invader. Todd successfully negotiated the great people of the CAF (Commemorative Air Force) to fly their A-26 Invader over to Texarkana Regional Airport and spend several hours with Captain Ralph Miller